Vegetarian diet health risks scholarly articles

By | November 8, 2020

vegetarian diet health risks scholarly articles

Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease. However, eliminating all animal products from the diet increases the risk of certain nutritional deficiencies. Micronutrients of special concern for the vegan include vitamins B and D, calcium, and long-chain n-3 omega-3 fatty acids. Unless vegans regularly consume foods that are fortified with these nutrients, appropriate supplements should be consumed. In some cases, iron and zinc status of vegans may also be of concern because of the limited bioavailability of these minerals.

The evidence for diet risk-reducing rjsks of consuming whole grains was assessed as possible for colorectal vegetarian and probable for type 2 scholarly and CVD. Varshil Mehta, A low-fat vegan diet improves glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in a health clinical trial in individuals with type diabetes. Food, nutrition, physical activity, and the prevention of diet products for diabetics articles global perspective. Barnard ND, et al. Swenson, and Risks. Elkan et al.

Western societies notice an increasing interest in plant-based eating patterns such as vegetarian and vegan, yet potential effects on the body and brain are a matter of debate. Therefore, we systematically reviewed existing human interventional studies on putative effects of a plant-based diet on the metabolism and cognition, and what is known about the underlying mechanisms. In addition, little is known, based on interventional studies about cognitive effects linked to plant-based diets. In sum, the increasing interest for plant-based diets raises the opportunity for developing novel preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity, eating disorders and related comorbidities. Still, putative effects of plant-based diets on brain health and cognitive functions as well as the underlying mechanisms remain largely unexplored and new studies need to address these questions. Western societies notice an increasing interest in plant-based eating patterns such as avoiding meat or fish or fully excluding animal products vegetarian or vegan, see Fig.

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